APJDD Vol 6 No 1 (Jan 2019)

APJDD Vol 6 No 1 (Jan 2019)

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1. Editorial Comment

Angela J. Fawcett, Editor-in-Chief

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2. Orthographic Advantage Theory: National advantage and disadvantage due to orthographic differences

2. Orthographic Advantage Theory: National advantage and disadvantage due to orthographic differences

Bruce Allen Knight1*,Susan A. Galletly1, Pamela S Gargett2

  1. Central Queensland University
  2. Queensland Department of Education, Training & Employment

 

Abstract

Considerable research reports nations differ in orthographic complexity (regularity and consistency of spelling patterns used); that this impacts ease and speed of reading and writing development; and that, in contrast to the world’s many regular-orthography nations, English word-reading and word-writing development is extremely slow, with difficulties more frequent and severe (Knight, Galletly & Gargett, 2017; Seymour, Aro, & Erskine, 2003; Share, 2008). Orthographic Advantage Theory proposes that, according to their level of orthographic complexity, nations experience disadvantage and potential advantage in multiple areas of education and national functioning. Building from current cross-linguistic theories and research on cross-linguistic differences, it proposes six dimensions of orthographic advantage and disadvantage, namely: ease of early literacy development; simplified school instruction and learning across primary and secondary school; ease of improving education; impacts of reduced workplace illiteracy; increased adult life advantage; and generational advantage through confidently literate parents being able to effectively support their children’s literacy development. This article details Orthographic Advantage Theory, building from review of research findings that show the major differences in reading development and outcomes in regular-orthography and Anglophone nations. The theory is offered as a tool for educators and researchers towards optimising reading and literacy outcomes.

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Keywords:          Orthographic Advantage Theory, reading development, writing development

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3. Preventing teacher burnout and promoting job satisfaction and retention: work values in teachers of learners with dyslexia in relation to organisational initiatives.

3. Preventing teacher burnout and promoting job satisfaction and retention: work values in teachers of learners with dyslexia in relation to organisational initiatives.

Geetha Shantha Ram1*,Ashraf Samsudin1

  1. Dyslexia Association of Singapore

Abstract

Research suggests that Special Educational Needs (SEN) teachers are more significantly impacted by teacher burnout than other teachers, which inherently affects teacher retention and the quality of the service eventually rendered in SEN schools and organisations. This article presents the findings of an exploratory study that sought to understand the alignment between the work values of the teachers of a special educational needs organisation supporting learners with dyslexia, the organisational policies and incentives implemented and their impact on job satisfaction and teacher burnout. The basis of the study is the notion that the particular combination of work values and the work environment guided by organisational values, impacts the wellbeing and continued employment of SEN teachers and an alignment between teachers’ work values and organisational Values encourages positive mental health through job satisfaction and therefore, a reduction in teacher burnout. To examine this, 111 Educational Therapists’ work values are surveyed through the use of the ONET Work Importance Profiler and the findings are discussed in relation to the organisational incentives and policies to investigate the consonance of these sets of Values. The interpretation of the results is then presented together with recommendations to organisations aiming to improve retention, job satisfaction and prevent teacher burnout through an improved alignment of Values

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Keywords:          Values, Work Values, Teacher burnout, Theory of Work Adjustment, Job satisfaction, SEN teachers, SEN organisations

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4. Children with learning difficulties and the move to Innovative Learning Environments

4. Children with learning difficulties and the move to Innovative Learning Environments

John Everatt1*,Jo Fletcher1

  1. University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Abstract

This paper discusses the perceptions of 283 New Zealand primary school principals and teachers about flexible learning spaces (Innovative Learning Environments), and the changes in pedagogical practices and classroom environments that these lead to, particularly in regard to outcomes in reading, writing and mathematics. Statements were general to all learners, but focused on struggling learners (students with learning difficulties), and targeted primary school educators given the importance of early learning for acquiring literacy and mathematics. An online questionnaire was distributed to both teachers and principals given their different influences on learning environments, management and teaching practices/interactions. Results indicated generally positive views of flexible learning spaces, though this varied with experience/professional development. Positive views were also less evident for questions related to low progress learners, suggesting that although New Zealand educators can see the benefits of flexible learning spaces, they seem more cautious about the value for those with learning problems.

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Keywords:          Innovative Learning Environments; New Zealand primary school; reading, writing and mathematics; struggling learners / learning difficulties; questionnaire responses; experience/professional development.

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