APJDD Vol 5 No 2 (July 2018)

APJDD Vol 5 No 2 (July 2018)

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1.Editorial Comment

1.Editorial Comment

Angela J. Fawcett, Editor-in-Chief

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2. Exploring the effectiveness of the English Examination Skills Programme on struggling non-dyslexic learners

2. Exploring the effectiveness of the English Examination Skills Programme on struggling non-dyslexic learners

Tuty Elfira Abdul Razak1, Emilyn See1, Joanne Tan Shi Huey1, Edmen Leong 1

  1. Dyslexia Association of Singapore

 

Abstract

The effectiveness of sequential, cumulative and multisensory intervention programmes on learners with dyslexia has been proven in multiple academic literature. This study serves as a follow-up on previous research which explored the classroom practices of the English Exam Skills Programme (EESP). In comparison between students with dyslexia and a control group, the previous study found significant progress in their grammar, vocabulary and comprehension components of their English examination paper after intervention. Aligning with the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework, the EESP is postulated to benefit all learners, including struggling learners with or without a diagnosis of SpLD or any learning difficulties, who are scoring below 65% in their school English Language examination papers. This study seeks to investigate the possible effectiveness of the EESP on a group of struggling non-dyslexic learners after a 20-week intervention. Results indicate a significant effect of intervention for this small group of non-dyslexic students.

 

Keywords:          English Exam Skills, structured intervention, dyslexia, struggling learners, Universal Design for Learning UDL

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3. The Applicability and Limitations of the Pupil Rating Scale Revised-Screening for Learning Disabilities in Chinese Children

3. The Applicability and Limitations of the Pupil Rating Scale Revised-Screening for Learning Disabilities in Chinese Children

Jieping Ou1, Ami Sambai2, Hiroki Yoneda1, Hong Pei1, & Akira Uno1

  1. University of Tsukuba
  2. Osaka Kyoiku University

 

Abstract

As more school learners face difficulties in learning Chinese and request for specific instructions increases, efficient assessment tools for these children are necessary. This study explores the applicability and limitations of the Pupil Rating Scale Revised-Screening for Learning Disabilities (PRS) for identifying children with learning problems. A total of 140 third-grade Chinese children from a primary school in Ningbo were tested for their reading and writing attainment, and teachers rated these children using a modified PRS. Of the participants, 18% were evaluated as having a low performance in reading and/or writing achievement tasks. However, according to the PRS’s diagnostic criteria, not one of these children was identified as having a learning disability based on teachers’ ratings. It is therefore hard to conclude that the PRS can be recommended for identifying children who are thought to have reading or writing deficits, or in other words, developmental dyslexia.

Keywords:          Learning Disabilities, the Pupil Rating Scale Revised (PRS), Applicability, Limitation

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4. Working and Phonological memory in dyslexia and SLI children in Indonesia:  preliminary studies

4. Working and Phonological memory in dyslexia and SLI children in Indonesia: preliminary studies

Rexsy Taruna1, Auliya Syaf1

  1. University of Abdurrab, Pekanbaru, Indonesia

 

Abstract

This research aimed to identify the working and phonological memory profile and whether these differ in severity in dyslexic and SLI children who were identified with dyslexia in Indonesia. In experiment 1, the WISC subtest digit span had been administered to obtain information about phonological memory ability in every child. Both groups (SLI and DD+SLI) showed the same degree of severity in under average phonological memory, with a non-significant trend to greater deficit in SLI+ based on poorly developed specification. In experiment 2, the performance of children with SLI and dyslexia without co-morbidity was compared on tests of working memory and executive function.  Both groups showed significant impairment in both numbers forwards and reversed, but children with SLI were significantly worse on numbers reversed than the children with dyslexia, indicating a greater difficulty in planning and executive function in children with SLI.

Keywords:          Dyslexia, specific language impairment, phonological memory, executive function, WISC

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