Written by Manmeet Kaur, Staff Professional Development (SPD) Executive, DAS Main Literacy Programme, RETA Affiliate Member

Our Educational Therapists (EdTs) at the Dyslexia Association of Singapore (DAS) meet their students’ parents twice every year (mid-year & end-year) to update them about how their child is progressing. However, some parents find it too difficult to schedule in a meeting. Does this mean they are less interested? - NO

Every parent invests time in their child's lives. However, sometimes due to other commitments like work and meetings, they may not be able to meet the dates and time the EdTs have scheduled in for them. But this certainly does not make communication impossible – not anymore! With technology these days, walls have fallen and communication happens in many ways such as phone calls, emails or even WhatsApp images, videos and audio and text messages.

We all agree that communication is important, especially when it comes to our children. I recall The Growth Mindset Coach: A Teacher’s Month-by-Month Handbook for Empowering Students to Achieve by Annie Brock and Heather Hundley - Chapter 4 (I AM a Valued Member of This Learning Community) that shared a very wonderful example of a letter from a teacher to parents - see Diagram 1 below:

Diagram 1: The Growth Mindset Coach: A Teacher’s Month-by-Month Handbook for Empowering Students to Achieve by Annie Brock and Heather Hundley (pg 88)

das blog parent teacher 1

 

Every week may be a little much but this may be important for students who need more attention and some support from parents at home would most definitely be very helpful. After all, it does take a village to raise a child and a child's development is best achieved with partnership from parents, teachers and all around him / her. The parents who have been actively involved in their children’s development tend to reflect upon this as bonding time with their child and this time also provides them an insight into how their child is progressing – both in terms of their strengths and weaknesses. A parent’s involvement shows the child that you are behind them every step of the way and as an advocate for the child, a parent can then work with the teacher on the next steps towards their goals - teamwork always gives better results.

Let us look at another example of a letter with feedback from a teacher to a parent on how to help a child facing some difficulties - see Diagram 2 below:

Diagram 2: The Growth Mindset Coach: A Teacher’s Month-by-Month Handbook for Empowering Students to Achieve by Annie Brock and Heather Hundley (pg 89)

das blog parent teacher 2